The Best Comic Book Runs of the 2010s

As we near the end of the 2010s, for my final look back at the decade in comics, I’m going to be looking at the best comic runs of the 2010s. This decade had some of the best and worst comic series, but I’m here to celebrate the best runs. The 2010s had a lot of good runs that were somewhat unappreciated, that I feel deserve acknowledgement. This is the decade that I got into comics, so I followed a lot of these when they were ongoing. Yet, there is enough distance from most of these runs — most of which are complete — that I feel comfortable judging them as a whole.

For comic runs, the amount of creators and issues varies, but the general idea should be obvious — a bunch of comics where at least one creator has a big presence in the creative process. To qualify for this list, the run needs to have had most of its issues released in the 2010s. That means Grant Morrison’s Batman and Geoff Johns’ Green Lantern, both of which started in the mid-2000s but ended in the 2010s, are out, but Jonathan Hickman’s Fantastic Four, which started in 2009 and ended in the 2010s, is allowed on. Essentially, the runs will have started in the 2010s, with a small handful of exceptions that had very few issues in the previous decade. The key part of it is that this is “runs” as opposed to a series — I’ll be copying a bit of CBR’s rules and say that miniseries do not count as “runs”, unless it’s a group of miniseries in some way; this is for the the best runs on a comic, not sprints. But it can be one ongoing series, something that had multiple series, or just a specific chunk of a series for whatever reason (maybe the creative team lost the artist or something). To keep things manageable, I’ll be focusing on writers and pencillers — not that inkers, colourists and letterers aren’t important, but it’s hard enough to get every artist down for some runs, and I’ll probably miss some, that this is just the compromise I have to make.

Anyway, with all the rules out of the way, let’s get on with it. Here, arbitrarily ranked, are the best comic runs of the 2010s!

(That I read).

Continue reading “The Best Comic Book Runs of the 2010s”

The Best Comic Book Story Arcs of the 2010s

As I’ve made clear in previous posts, the 2010s were a good time for comics. I’ve looked at the best comic runs, but now I’m taking it a step down and going into the best comic arcs. These aren’t entire series — unless it’s a miniseries or an ongoing that was cut short — or runs, but arcs. Naming these is a bit weird because some writers don’t really name their arcs, but luckily trades exist, and you can usually tell when something is an arc.

To qualify, the first issue of the arc needs to have been released in the 2010s. That limits my options enough while setting strict rules. Hopefully this makes it fair. Also, this is more of a superhero comic thing, so be warned if that bugs you.

Anyway, get your six (most likely) bag and boards ready, because we’re going to be looking at the best comic book story arcs of the 2010s!

Continue reading “The Best Comic Book Story Arcs of the 2010s”

ResurrXion, Part 3 — Something Original and Interesting and Something That Is Neither (Rantings)

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Magneto should never have that much stubble or be that pretty, Sinister looks like a pretty boy Disney villain and Juggernaut looks unfinished… Mystique and Apocalypse look cool though

Iceman

Written by Sina Grace
Art by Alessandro Vitti

For those who don’t know, Iceman sort of came out as gay within the pages of All-New X-Men (volume 1). There was controversy regarding the way writer Brian Michael Bendis went about this, but it’s something that seems to be sticking with the character. Once the teen, time-displaced Iceman tells his adult counterpart that he’s gay, the adult Iceman acts relieved in what’s actually a touching scene. Sina Grace promises to delve into Iceman’s past relationships with women, which I think will be interesting (and hopefully it’s not another excuse to make Polaris crazy). Little else is known about the series, so I’m going to believe it’s a more character-driven one, especially given the statement about exploring Iceman’s past relationships.

I’m not familiar with the creative team, but I do like that a gay man is writing it. Having personal experiences comparable to that of the characters allow you to relate your experiences and always helps with authenticity, but I just hope Sina Grace doesn’t get typecast as “the gay writer” like Christopher Priest did with Black characters. I’m not familiar with Grace’s work as a writer, but I did enjoy his art on Li’l Depressed Boy (though writer Steven S. Struble’s colouring probably played a big part in that). I’m not very familiar with Alessandro Vitti’s work at all, but he did draw Charles Soule’s run on Red Lanterns, and his work there was appropriately messy, but in a controlled way. I’m not sure if that’s just his style or if he went for that look intentionally.

Iceman has a creator I like and has the potential to be a better exploration of homosexuality than many other comics, but I just do not care about Iceman, and the way he was “revealed” to be gay irks me. I’d actually be much more interested in this comic if it were a newer character, or an older one whose homosexuality had a less… controversial history. Someone like Rictor would suit a project like this (in fact, Peter David actually did tackle Rictor’s relationship with a woman after she found out he was gay), basically any gay character who dated a decent amount of people of the opposite sex before coming out as gay. But if you’re looking for a good exploration of a gay character, and don’t mind the way that Iceman was “outed”, and/or are interested in Iceman, this sounds like it will be a decent read.

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What is even this cast?!

Generation X

Written by Christina Strain
Art by Amilcar Pinna

I repeat: what is even this cast? No, really, we have Jubilee, Bling (who I think is gay and might have a crush on Jubilee), um… the guy who checked out Magik’s ass but then was revealed to be gay (in case you didn’t know, Bendis makes things up as he goes)… he makes himself look like other people or something. Quentin Quire (why does he keep getting use?!), um… Disney Princess Girl, and I think Northstar. Oh, and Eye-Boy. I did not make up that last one.

It’s apparently going to explore the cast as a bunch of misfit outsiders within the new X-School, which is now in New York, to further connect the X-Men with the wider Marvel universe. I honestly don’t care. New X-Men: Academy X was the best version of “Hogwarts for mutants”, and it didn’t use the tired trope of the losers vs. jocks. And you just know some characters are going to be written out of character to justify this misfit band getting together.

The characters are all D-listers except Jubilee, who’s a C-lister Marvel doesn’t know what to do with. She’s a vampire now (don’t ask, it was dumb) and also a single mum because she literally stole a baby and just kept it. She also really liked dumping the baby on other characters, and was honestly just an awful parent. And yet, the future version of the kid comes back at one point and says she was a great mother! As an Education student, Jubilee’s treatment of Shogo just annoys me. Quentin Quire is an edgelord mutant teen who likes to act edgy and kicked off the horrible Schism event. He’s awful and never develops but is shilled by Jason Aaron, and I don’t get why he still gets use. The rest are boring and/or pointless which was probably intentional to fit in with this misfit idea, but that still means they’re boring and/or pointless.

I’ve read nothing by Christina Strain, but she apparently is a cover artist and did some of the Runaways covers. I’m not sure if she’s done any interior art, but I sincerely hope so, since that would at least be some storytelling experience with comics. Amilcar Pinna is also relatively obscure, but drew the first arc of the short-lived All-New Ultimates. The art was… okay. It was pretty but didn’t work for actual storytelling, everything looking a bit too stilted and too posed. Male faces resembled Steve Dillon’s to a degree, and that is not a positive in my books. There was also the problem of conveying motion… in that it was nonexistent. So the creative team seems to be inexperienced, to say the least.

I don’t get why Generation X exists. It’s got a boring cast, a boring premise and seems to exist so there’s a young mutant book on the stands. Why is it even called Generation X? The original was a bad pun, so aside from some slight brand recognition, why use that name? Aside from it maybe fitting with the whole “misfit” idea, I mean? Whatever, this series looks pointless.

(note: this was NOT published on the 6th of December like it seems to think it was. It was published on the 12th of December.)