Iron Fist (2017) #1 Review

Written by Ed Brisson
Art by Mike Perkins
Colours by Andy Troy
Published by Marvel
Cover price: $3.99 USD

With the mixed reception to his portrayal in David Walker’s Power Man and Iron Fist and a bigger spotlight due to Netflix’s Iron Fist series, Ed Brisson was probably under a lot of pressure to get Iron Fist right, which isn’t exactly an easy task. The last time the character was really relevant was Ed Brubaker and Matt Fraction’s amazing Immortal Iron Fist run, which had a darker approach to the character while also embracing the martial arts and mysticism elements and building his world in interesting ways. Brisson is seemingly trying to recapture that spirit, and his first issue does a good job setting up something hopefully great, but can’t help but feel a bit generic. Continue reading “Iron Fist (2017) #1 Review”

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Batwoman: Rebirth #1 Review

Written by Margurite Bennett and James Tynion IV
Art by Steve Epting
Colours by Jeromy Cox
Published by DC Comics
Cover price: $2.99 USD

I don’t think  its wrong to say that Batwoman has stumbled a bit over the last few years. Her solo stories in Detective Comics and Batwoman started strong, but then J. H. Williams III wasn’t allowed to marry Kate and Maggie Sawyer and rage quit the series, and DC rushed to find a replacement lest they take their time and screw up their precious numbering, and the result was Marc Andreyko’s thoroughly disliked run. After petering out, Batwoman would be banished to comic book limbo, only making occasional guest appearances in larger Bat-stories like the two Eternal series, and even then she barely did anything. But then she got tied closer to the Bat-family in James Tynion IV’s mostly good Detective Comics run, and they decided to launch another Batwoman ongoing under up-and-coming writer Marguerite Bennett (AnimosityBombshells). Since a lot of people probably aren’t familiar with Batwoman’s history — since she was barely affected by the 2011 reboot — this Rebirth one-shot could have been used to catch new readers up on her backstory, while also setting up new stories. It only does the latter well. Continue reading “Batwoman: Rebirth #1 Review”

Super Sons #1 Review

Written by Peter J. Tomasi
Art by Jorge Jimenez
Colours by Alejandro Sanchez
Published by DC Comics
Cover price: $2.99 USD

Peter J. Tomasi is a writer who has always excelled at sentiment. From the restless Kyle Rayner and Guy Gardner in Green Lantern Corps to the father-son dynamic in Batman and Robin, to the more recent, and different, father-son dynamic in Superman, it’s clear Tomasi has an affinity for pulling at the heart strings in the superhero genre. Super Sons is Tomasi taking a stab at writing boyhood adventures, and, to nobody’s surprise, he knocks it out of the park. Super Sons #1 is a really fun comic about two boys and their budding friendship doing what boys their age do, only with more capes and fighting and less parental supervision. Continue reading “Super Sons #1 Review”

Justice League of America: Rebirth #1 Review and Recap

Written by Steve Orlando
Art by Ivan Reis, Joe Prado and Oclair Albert
Colours by Marcelo Maiolo
Published by DC Comics
Cover price $2.99 USD

Review and Recap is where I give a quick review of a comic, usually less in-depth than my regular reviews, before recapping it and adding some commentary here and there. Obviously spoilers abound in the commentary section. Anyway, here’s my Review and Recap of Justice League of America: Rebirth #1.

The Review:

The name ‘Justice League of America’ hasn’t had much luck in the last few years. Geoff Johns’ series seemed to exist solely to tie-in to his Trinity War and Forever Evil events, and Bryan Hitch’s version was so unremarkable that I’ve heard nobody speak of it outside of maybe one scene and bemoaning its numerous delays. But third time’s the charm, right? Surely Steve Orlando can take a team of B-list, Arrowverse-friendly characters (and Lobo) and finally give the name something worth a damn, right? Apparently, yes. Thanks to a clear mission statement for the team and motives for its cast of interesting characters, Justice League of America is off to a promising start.

The story is fairly straightforward — Batman recruits his Justice League. But Orlando does a good job clearly giving reasons for the characters (well, most of them) to join, while also setting up the various team dynamics. It’s nothing remarkable, but there’s a lot of potential for future stories set up, and the various relationships are interesting and set up well. The team’s mission statement, according to Batman, is to be a team that people can know and be inspired by, as opposed to the gods of the Justice League. It’s a good idea, and would mostly work if it weren’t for the presence of Batman himself, who has a secret identity, a mythic quality to him and is a Leaguer. That aside, the set-up is very well done while maintaining a good pace.

Something that helps the issue is that its characters, none of whom could be considered A-list aside from Batman, are fair game for whatever Orlando wants to do with them. Unlike the cast of Justice League, most of the cast of Justice League of America don’t have any other ongoing comic that their development is reserved for. Steve Orlando is free to develop his characters how he sees fit, so it’s much easier to get emotionally invested in the characters, rather than just the plot. It might be my cynicism, but as it is, it’s far more likely that I’ll be invested in whatever happens to Lobo in this series than Barry Allen and Jessica Cruz dating in Justice League, since I know there’s no Lobo ongoing that’s more important and already has a love interest for him.

Ivan Reis’ art is mostly good, with his usual flair for lighting and expressive faces for the most part. However, it feels a bit rushed, whether that be some more ill-defined faces or just rushed inking from Joe Prado and/or Oclair Albert. While it’s by no means weak — Reis, Prado and Maiolo are still a treat — the art is just not quite up to the standards I have for this art team.

Justice League of America: Rebirth #1 is a superhero comic with an interesting cast with interesting relationships and a great art team. While its B-list cast could’ve been a hindrance, Steve Orlando knows how to get readers invested. If this issue and the previous one-shots are any indicator, Justice League of America is shaping up to be the Justice League comic worth reading.

4/5 – Very Good

Join me after the jump for the commentary! Continue reading “Justice League of America: Rebirth #1 Review and Recap”

The Atom: Rebirth #1 Review and Recap

This is a new thing I’m trying where I briefly review (shut up, I totally know how to be brief!) a comic before providing commentary as I recap it. Just wanted to try something new, and where better to start than the start of Steve Orlando’s Justice League of America run?

Oh, and I totally stole this format from a Tumblr I use to read called Eee! Tess Ate Chai Tea, who I thought had stopped posting, but I guess not. Oh, and that awful name should inform you of the high calibre stuff I used to read.

Written by Steve Orlando
Art by Andy MacDonald
Colours by John Rauch

The Review:

The Atom: Rebirth was something I kind of just picked up out of mild curiosity. I don’t care about any of the Atoms, and I’m not a fan of Steve Orlando. But I decided to give it a go for the sake of testing the waters of Justice League of America, something else I wasn’t sure about, and it’s actually a good read! A nice and heartwarming, self-contained origin story for Ryan Choi’s Atom.

The comic has a nice sci-fi vibe to it, like if you combined the art style and general style of Marvel’s recent Ant-Man ongoing with a bit of Silver Age charmRyan’s relationship with Ray Palmer is a sweet student-mentor one, and he’s got something of a supporting cast built up, with his parents, roommate and possibly Jean Loring. While I’m not too keen on one of the few prominent Asian superheroes being an awkward nerd (complete with lots of allergies!), it was nice to see Ryan’s relationship with Ray bring him out of his shell a little. There’s decent potential for future stories, though how this issue sets up what it was supposed to (Justice League of America), remains to be seen. Regardless, The Atom: Rebirth is just a good story and introduction to Ryan Choi, with some stuff set up for the future.

4/5 – Very good

See? I can be succinct! Anyway, click below the line for the commentary! (Also, I stole this thing from Henchman-4-Hire’s Teen Titans reviews) Continue reading “The Atom: Rebirth #1 Review and Recap”

ABZÛ Review – Depth and Simplicity

Developer: Giant Squid Studios
Plaforms: PC (reviewed), PS4
Date of play: 3/08/12
Play time: 98 minutes

ABZÛ is a game I didn’t really know about until a couple of months ago. But Austin Wintory tweeted about it and I follow him so I figured it must be good, if only for the music. Wintory composed the soundtrack for Journey, which is still my favourite game of all time. And that’s good, because ABZÛ is very similar to Journey. It maintains the design choices of Journey: minimal user-interface, minimalist storytelling and a focus on music and visuals (specifically architecture) to tell a narrative. At the same time, however, ABZÛ managed to carve out its own identity with a heartwarming story with a strong moral, a beautiful aesthetic and immersive (pun) gameplay. Continue reading “ABZÛ Review – Depth and Simplicity”

Industry Talk – Video Games, Their Constant Evolution, Their Critique and What Separates Them from Other Media

YouTuber Nerd Cubed received an e-mail from Australian indie developer ODD Games last week that just… astounds me with its sheer stupidity, but also made me realise that some people just plain don’t understand how video game reviews work (or at least pretend not to), and made me want to clear up what separates video games from other art forms.

1
Why exactly did it take ODD Games a year to send that email?

Continue reading “Industry Talk – Video Games, Their Constant Evolution, Their Critique and What Separates Them from Other Media”