My Top 10 Best Venom Stories

The Venom movie starring Tom Hardy has just hit theatres has been in theatres for a while. Plus, Donny Cates’ Venom series has recently finished its first arc and loves to dip into the symbiotes’ mythos. With that in mind, now is a good time to look back on past Venom comics and get some sweet, sweet clicks.

I’ve always been fond of Venom, but before 2018, my experience was largely with adaptions and the series launched by Rick Remender starring Flash Thompson. But after getting really into Donny Cates’ current run, I dug into a lot of Venom’s past appearances and comics, and I think I’ve sufficiently got a grasp of the character. So without further adieu, here are my personal favourite Venom stories. Continue reading “My Top 10 Best Venom Stories”

Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows (2016) #1 Review

Written by: Gerry Conway
Art by: Ryan Stegman
Colours by: Sonia Oback

Joe Quesada and J. Michael Straczynski’s “One More Day” story (yes, I know JMS wanted his name removed from the issue) ranks up there with “The Night Gwen Stacy Died” as one of the most important Spider-Man stories ever told. It’s by no means good, but its effects can still be felt to this day, every time Mary Jane Watson is onscreen or Peter is in a relationship. While many feel Marvel’s Spider-Man line recovered once Dan Slott came aboard, there are also those who feel his run has gone on too long, and those who just want Peter Parker and MJ back together. This issue, a follow-up to the well-liked Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows miniseries by Dan Slott and Adam Kubert, released during Secret Wars (2015), is meant to appease those people. So how does it do? Okay. Just okay. Continue reading “Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows (2016) #1 Review”

Avengers (2016) #1 Review

Written by: Mark Waid
Pencils by: Mike del Mundo
Colours by: Mike del Mundo, Marco D’alfonso

Here it is, the comic people have been waiting for. While Mark Waid’s All-New, All-Different Avengers (ANAD Avengers) started off strong, it always felt weighed down by, among other things, its younger characters (Kamala Khan, Miles Morales, Sam Alexander). The idea was admirable, making the Avengers act more like mentors and bringing a youthful perspective to the team, but it never really gelled and they felt like a hindrance. But now those characters have been shipped off to Mark Waid’s Champions, and that’s actually a very good read that focuses on youthful waywardness and hormones. So with the kids out of the way in a well-written series, Mark Waid can finally write a great classic-style Avengers comic too, right? Well, if so, it’s not this issue. Continue reading “Avengers (2016) #1 Review”