Biggest Comic Letdowns of 2017

To me, there are two types of “bad” comic: something that is just badly crafted in terms of story/art or something that’s disappointing. To me, the latter is worse. You can usually see a bad comic coming a mile away, but a comic that has everything needed to be good and fails anyway, that will always hurt more. 2017 has been a solid year for comics, but there have been some disappointment. Some of these were set up in 2016, while others were a bit newer to the poop party. Regardless, they let me down in a big way, and I need to make a list, dammit! So in ascending order, here are my top comic letdowns of 2017.

Also, the reason this list is super late is because I wasn’t going to do it. It just got too far into 2018… then I saw ProJared (and others) make 2017 lists still and decided to just make this super succinct. So I’m doing this quick and dirty, because I just need to get these off my chest. Continue reading “Biggest Comic Letdowns of 2017”

Advertisements

Recommendations for the New Comic Reader – Marvel (2016, Q3)

This is going to be a lot more difficult, what with Marvel’s second Marvel NOW relaunch imminent. But for completion’s sake (I’m doing Q3 for the other companies), and because there’s still some recommendations to make, I’m still doing it. Also, I reconsidered by criteria, and I don’t think high issue count is a problem so long as the series catches you up well, which Marvel series do with a good recap page (DC really needs to do this). So here we go.

1

Silver Surfer
Written by Dan Slott
Currently on issue 6

Dan Slott’s Silver Surfer is the comic that made me like the Silver Surfer (Norrin Radd). So much that I went diving into the back issue bins and bought a ton of his first big ongoing, written by Steve Englehart. Slott’s run is about Norrin Radd’s adventures with human companion Dawn Greenwood, a girl who never really left her home town. At least that’s what the previous series, also by Slott, was about. The current ongoing is about Surfer and Dawn returning to Earth after their exploits, and the hijinks that ensue.

But Silver Surfer’s plots, aside from being Silver Age-level craziness, mainly serve as a way to explore the relationship between Norrin and Dawn. Because he doesn’t understand many human customs — don’t worry, Slott’s the one writer I’ve seen who can pull this off consistently without it getting annoying — and she’s experiencing the wackier side of the Marvel universe. Their relationship is adorable, and you do get attached to Dawn as a character, rather than just an audience surrogate. But at the same time, these stories feel epic, and the Surfer’s way of speaking definitely adds to that. The stories are big and epic, but never lose heart because of Slott’s focus on Norrin and Dawn.

Another reason the dialogue works is the art style. The series is drawn by one of my favourite artists, Mike Allred. His art style can best be described as pop art, and is essentially a more modernised version of the style you’d see in Silver Age comics from artists like Jack Kirby. Thick line work gives everything a classic look, and this suits the Surfer’s cheesier dialogue. Laura Allred’s colours make the style even more distinct, and the result is a series that looks fittingly retro yet modern.

If you’re looking for heartwarming yet epic stories that feel like am homage to a more innocent time, all focused on two incredibly endearing characters, and would like to see one of the best artists today in his comfort zone, pick up Silver Surfer. Continue reading “Recommendations for the New Comic Reader – Marvel (2016, Q3)”