The Death of the New 52, One Year Later — A Look Back

In 2016, DC’s Rebirth relaunch promised a return to the spirit of the pre-Flashpoint DC Universe while keeping the New 52 universe. Rebirth has proven to be an unmitigated success, both critically and financially, and has clearly reinvigorated the company. But while it promised to keep the New 52 canon, this didn’t turn out to be the case, with series like Wonder Woman and Superman almost entirely doing away with New 52 canon. Although the New 52 branding itself was removed with the DC YOU initiative, DC Rebirth can be considered a much truer shunting of the ideas and themes of the New 52 era. Gone is the unnecessary darkening of characters, government paranoia and notion of continuity and history being obstacles and not tools so prevalent at DC for so long.

While there were some good elements here and there, the overall New 52 reboot fell flat on its face. And with DC Rebirth now a year old, incorporating many elements of Pre-Flashpoint elements that fans have been missing, I think it’s a good time to look back on the New 52. As it’s said, “I come here to bury Caesar, not honour him.” This will be a broad look at the problems with the New 52, and why it never quite worked for (the majority) of readers. So join me as I take a look back on the New 52, one year after its official death. Continue reading “The Death of the New 52, One Year Later — A Look Back”

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ResurrXion, Part 6 — Look Who Came Crawling Back!

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It’s been a while since I gave my thoughts on the initial ResurrXion line-up. Well, the ones that were announced right away, at least. I completely missed Black Bolt and Old Man Logan continuing, and it just got to the point that they became old news. If you want my opinions on that real quick, I’ll give them real quick at the end of this post.

I’m not here to focus on those series. For you see, today I get to do what I love most: act like a bitch and be super smug! And why? Well, Charles Soule is returning to the X-Men as the writer of a new Astonishing X-Men series! Yes, the same Charles Soule who wrote the mostly good (for its last issue) Death of Wolverine before jumping ship to the Inhumans and penning the awful Death of X and even-more-awful Inhumans vs. X-Men! And my smugness can be summed up with:

Oh, did you and the Inhumans not work out? I’m so sorry to hear that, Charlie! And no, I wasn’t laughing behind your back! I was full on rooting for you guys! Or, if you want a more direct connection:

I’m drawing all the attention to it, Soule! All! Of! The! Attention! If there’s one thing this blog isn’t, it’s classy!

Okay, I’m done now. I just wanted to be a bitch. In all seriousness, here are my thoughts on Charles Soule’s upcoming Astonishing X-Men series.

11Astonishing X-Men
Written by Charles Soule
Art by TBA

The Astonishing X-Men title is so associated with Joss Whedon that people forget that there were indeed other writers, up to and including Warren Ellis! Charles Soules’ series doesn’t seem to have anything in common with the well-known Whedon run — which partly tried to incorporate the X-Men more into the Marvel universe and have them act as more traditional superheroes (something that it gave up on pretty quickly) — other than just being a good jumping-on point for new fans, something Soules touts, which isn’t exactly unique to Astonishing. The aforementioned idea of the X-Men being more present in the Marvel Universe is being handled elsewhere, so it seems Astonishing X-Men is just called that because it’s something that’s not Uncanny X-Men or just X-Men, which is strange, as Marvel is going to be renumbering all their ongoings with “legacy numbers” later this year.

Anyway, regarding the comic itself, very little is known. In fact, this series’ reveal was actually gradual, weirdly enough. Its roster was revealed bits at a time, then finally its name and writer. I’m not sure why it was built up, but I can’t deny that it’s probably going to be one of the better X-books coming out of ResurrXion. But that’s if I really separate Charles Soule from his recent X-work. Because… oy. But he says the story told will build on itself, and it will have focus in that sense. That’s a good idea, given the sporadic nature of some X-runs, though it has me worried he’ll use his horribly written version of Emma Frost (Charles Soule is to Emma Frost what Jason Aaron was to Cyclops).

But before I get into that, let’s talk about the cast. It’s mostly good! Old Man Logan seems to be succumbing to the old Wolverine curse of being on a lot of different series and teams. I count three so far, and I wouldn’t be surprised if he were put on an Avengers team again. But his character is interesting, and it will be interesting to see him lead a team (if he is the leader, which the cover seems to indicate he is). Archangel is always good for some angst and dark stories, along with a plain cool look. Psylocke is a cool character with an interesting history and relationship with Archangel. While I’ve found her kind of boring outside of Rick Remender’s Uncanny X-Force, she has potential and she throws a wrench into the cast. And that’s because of the presence of Fantomex, a character I’ve always seen as a more self-aware Gambit. He’s a thief who steals to distract from his constant urge to kill. He’s fun, though works best when playing off Psylocke and Archangel and other super serious characters. Oh, and speaking of Gambit, he’s here too. I’ve never been his biggest fan, but he’s fun and can lighten the mood when not angsting about whatever contrived Thieves Guild story he’s taking part in. Rogue is here too, and that makes this series give off a real soap-opera vibe, given the Psylocke/Archangel/Fantomex thing and now Rogue and Gambit. It seems like Rogue has been handled surprisingly well by Gerry Duggan over in Uncanny Avengers, and I always like to see her around. She’s a versatile character who works best when she’s a tough-but-caring Southern Belle using her own experiences to help others. Oh, and Mystique is here, in case we didn’t have enough drama. I like Mystique in the right role, and assuming she’s the token evil member of the team, I can see her having an interesting dynamic with Archangel, encouraging his darker tendencies. Also, I’d like to see how her relationships with Rogue and Logan develop, given her rocky relationship with the former and… complicated relationship with the original Logan . And then there’s Forge who exists and I don’t care about him.

Now, the elephant in the room — Charles Soule… Charles Soule was once a writer I really liked. I enjoyed his Thunderbolts run, and he managed to make the dumb concept that Daniel Way started work. I’ve heard nothing but good things about his Swamp Thing run, which I’m told far surpassed Scott Snyder’s and seemed to create an interesting mythology. His Red Lanterns run was really the only part of that series worth reading, and while I never finished, I really want to. He definitely seemed to understand the characters, especially Guy Gardner, while also keeping true to the idea of the group. I found Inhuman to be a pretty good read with some interesting characters (who became less interesting over time) and concepts. His She-Hulk run has been thoroughly praised, and I’m assuming utilised his law skills well. His Daredevil run has some cool ideas and what I read of it (I omnibus-wait Daredevil (I am not kidding) seemed like he was doing a good job bringing darkness back into Daredevil’s world after Mark Waid’s run. Thought it was rough when I read it, I’ve heard it’s really picked up. Then came his X-Men work…

While I largely enjoyed Death of Wolverine and thought it had a fitting ending, the miniseries itself felt like it had quite a bit of padding while also not quite adequately summing up Logan’s life. But what followed… I have heard nobody speak of Wolverines, Marvel’s attempt at a weekly ongoing to compete with DC’s two Batman Eternal series. I couldn’t read more than two issues of Death of X, where Soule decided to nonsensically kill off Jamie Madrox — who was the closest thing to a lead character in Peter David’s amazing X-Factor run (the second one he did) — and Cyclops, in such a low-key way that I’m sure it was meant to be profound that Cyke went out like he did, but it comes off as disrespectful given the characters rich’s history, importance to the franchise, and large fanbase. Oh, and the ending was awful and filled with plot holes. Then he wrote Inhumans vs. X-Men, which, while concluding the awful Terrigen poisoning plot (which I will be writing something on due to its awfulness), it had an amazing amount of plot holes, only some of which were carried over from Death of X — there were inconsistencies within the series itself! Oh, and Uncanny Inhumans was kind of boring and didn’t seem to get the appeal of the Inhumans. So yeah, Soule started out as an up-and-comer I really liked, but 2016 was not a good year for him, and I basically replaced him with Tom King.

A year ago I’d have been excited for this series, but Soule has really fallen in my eyes. While I had to let out the pettiness early in this post, I really hope this series is his comeback. Because it has a good cast, good planning and a writer who I know can do better than he has recently. I am cautiously optimistic about Astonishing X-Men. Continue reading “ResurrXion, Part 6 — Look Who Came Crawling Back!”

Marvel’s New Free Digital Comics System Is Crap (Rantings)

Marvel comics have long since been more expensive than DC’s, even before DC dropped most of their comics down to $2.99 (USD) per issue with their Rebirth relaunch. But Marvel’s issues also came with a free digital copy of the issue for their online service, which is also linked to Comixology, so buyers could sort of justify the higher price point. Well, no longer!

In a controversial move, Marvel announced that physical comics (excluding their all-ages stuff) will now come with two other digital comics, intended to “offer fans free entry points for current on sale collected edition”, rather than a free digital copy of the comic purchased. To me, this is just not good for most readers.

For one, the digital comic you’re given is just out of your hands. It’s up to Marvel to decide what you get, and it may even be something you already own. Hell, the first comic lined up is Civil War II #0, a comic I’m pretty sure 90% of Marvel readers have, since that was before everyone realised how crappy that event was. I’ve read that some people even sell the digital code they get with their physical copies, because it can offset the higher price point by a bit, but that options mostly gone now, since I can see lots of over saturation of the same issue.

There’s also the problem of whatever comic you’re being given is supposed to advertise whatever Marvel wants to advertise (the digital comic doesn’t seem to vary between comics within a given week). So whereas giving readers of X-Men: Prime a digital issue of Inhumans vs. X-Men would make sense, instead they’re given the first issue of whatever trade Marvel wants to push (who wants to bet there will be a decent amount of MCU-focused comics?).

There’s also this simple thing: Marvel already pushed free samples before. It was a while ago, I’ll give you, but not that long ago. Remember Amazing Spider-Man #1 from 2014? That comic was incredibly thick, not only because it was the launch pad for the entire Spider-Man line, but also because it had the entirety of Inhuman #1 included as a free sampler. But you still got the free digital issue of Amazing Spider-Man (2014) #1.

And finally, there’s the fact that whatever free digital comic you get is replacing the other comic you would’ve gotten. I know people who like to buy physical comics and support local comic shops, but find it simply impractical to read physical comics for a variety of reasons, but the free digital copy allowed them to still support their LCSs. And that Marvel is saying this new system is good for retailers is hilarious, because I know people who work at comic shops, and they’ve had nothing good to say about this. In fact, if anything this feels like an aggressive move against comics retailers.

This is just not a good move in my eyes, and the only people who benefit are new readers (and even then not that much, since the free issue is from a recent trade) and Marvel themselves. It pushes for more digital sales from people who were willing to buy physical, while taking those sales from retailers. I can’t say I support this move at all.

My Future Comic Projects for Geoff Johns (Rantings)

I don’t think it’s out of line to say that Geoff Johns is one of DC’s biggest name creators. He, along with David S. Goyer, brought the Justice Society of America to a new generation of readers. He had a run on The Flash that many consider second only to the beloeved Mark Waid run. He reinvigorated and redefined the Green Lantern franchise. He updated Aquaman for modern audiences (though Peter David sort-of did that before him). But he also has blatant preference for the Silver Age. Infinite Crisis was, although an enjoyable story, a way for him to restore quite a few Silver Age things to canon. He made Legion of Super-Heroes lore confusing with the “Retroboot” Legion (basically the original Legion but with a timeskip). He sort-of ruined the Flash franchise with The Flash: Rebirth (it’s only slightly recovered with the return of Wally West). Then killed off beloved new characters with Blackest Night, an event that seemed to exist partly to kill off modern characters. Then he screwed up the entire DC Universe with Flashpoint… though that was editorially mandated, and he then proceeded to sort-of fix with DC Universe: Rebirth #1. So Johns has a shaky history, despite being DC’s “big gun”.

But he vanished for a while. After finishing his Justice League run (about half of which I haven’t read), Johns moved on. He was focusing more on TV shows and movies. It seemed like he came back just to fix what he was forced to break, and that would be the last we’d here from him… or not.

Yes, Geoff Johns is returning to comics. And while I’m cautiously optimistic about this, given the mixed results of his writing, I can’t say I’m not at least somewhat looking forward to Johns’ return. For all his faults (Silver Age boner, excessive violence, unsubtle leaning on the fourth wall), Johns loves superhero comics, big scope stories and using continuity in (mostly) respectful ways. He’s the kind of writer the DC Rebirth initiative is perfect for. And while I’m sure his comics work will in some way involve the Watchmen plotline from the Rebirth line, I have little doubt he will also be taking on another project. And here are what I hope or predict they will be. Continue reading “My Future Comic Projects for Geoff Johns (Rantings)”

ResurrXion, Part 5 — Seems like It’s Better to Go Solo (Rantings)

Okay, so I didn’t completely think this format through, so now Cable’s all by his lonesome. But hey, that’s probably for the best. He can not be tainted by another series… though I had to stretch for a title for this post.

Well that all went to waste! For the record, I was going to call this post “ResurrXion, Part 5 — Cable’s Gonna Be a Star, Man (Rantings)”. Anyway, I’m glad All-New Wolverine is continuing (and hopefully this also means Jeff Lemire’s Old Man Logan also gets to continue), but more on that after Cable.

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No feet, big weird guns… but not enough pouches.

Cable

Written by James Robinson
Art by Carlos Pacheco

Now that is a creative team! Ahem. Anyway, Cable is a character I don’t think Marvel knows what to do with. His last really successful stories were when he played the straight man to Deadpool in the beloved Cable & Deadpool series. There have been numerous attempts to reinvigorate the character over the years — acting as a surrogate father to Hope Summers in Cable (volume 2), giving him his own X-Force team in Cable and X-Force, trying to recreate the magic of Cable & Deadpool, and even making him an Avenger over in Uncanny Avengers — but the character just doesn’t have a really defined role. He’s a nineties creation through and through, with a somewhat complicated backstory. But he’s also fairly popular, and his friendship with Deadpool really benefits him. James Robinson seems to want to give him a more defined role, and one that suits the time-hopping mass of muscle.

Cable is going to feature the eponymous time-travelling mutant anti-hero running through time and combating enemy time-travellers out to abuse the timeline. It’s been done before, my favourite version being in DC’s Booster Gold ongoing that spun out of 52, but Cable’s anti-hero ways will bring a nice touch to things. The antagonist will be a new villain (though I’m calling it: he’s an unused old character with a new name) called Conquest, a name straight out of the nineties. Settings Robinson has mentioned include 15th century Japan, World War I, the Stone Age and Victorian England. I’m not sure Cable’s the right character to give us a historical piece, but it’s definitely more subdued than what I initially expected. However, I fully expect some references to other Marvel works, because this is Robinson.

And speaking of James Robinson, he’s a great writer. His Starman is something I still need to get into, but I’ve read the first issue and dug it. It updates old concepts for modern times, and does so while honouring the past. Robinson is like Grant Morrison in that sense, but holds the past in reverence but doesn’t feel the need for weird changes and incomprehensibility. He can tell great, cinematic stories with great world-building like with Earth 2 (before editors screwed him over… then screwed Tom Taylor over). His skill with continuity and fondness of the Golden Age I think will be a big benefit for Cable, as the series will likely involve playing with Marvel continuity and some war stories.

Carlos Pacheco is an artist I like whenever I see his work, but I rarely see it. His work on Uncanny X-Men (volume 2) was great, and he can actually draw different faces and figures, which look nice but not exceedingly nice as to be fanservice (though he draws a great Emma Frost). Pacheco excels at expression, while being able to be subtle unlike other artists who excel at expression. I’m not sure how he’s going to fit into Cable’s probably darker stories, but at least the art will look nice.

Cable has an okay premise, but the creative team is why I’m looking forward to it. Time travel suits Robinson, and Pacheco is an excellent artist. While I’m not sure about the choice of character, I have faith in this team.

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That is a generic cover right there. Also, weird shoulder pads for some reason.

All-New Wolverine
Written by Tom Taylor
Art by Leonard Kirk

So All-New Wolverine does get to continue! Though I’m not sure why it’s not being renumbered, what with Marvel’s love on new series, I’m glad it is and that Tom Taylor is staying as writer. I’m reading All-New Wolverine in trade, and although the first volume is uneven and kind of generic, the second, though not subtle, makes me feel like Taylor gets the character and has given her a fitting role as a big sister figure and hero. Once Taylor stopped following the Wolverine Plot Blueprint, he was able to tell good stories, though they are still flawed (I plan on reviewing the second trade soon).

If the lack of a renumbering didn’t give it away, All-New Wolverine isn’t relaunching as part of ResurrXion, but starting a new arc called “Immune”. The arc supposedly follows on from the previous story arc, “Enemy of the State II” (by the way, I’m pretty sure there was already an arc called that, if not in Wolverine, then in Black Panther), which I haven’t read yet. But “Immune” will have a virus outbreak leading to the government cordoning off a city, and Laura going in. An alien child speaks Laura’s name with her dying breath — though I’m pretty sure the kid is gonna say ‘Wolverine’ as opposed to Laura or X-23 — and that messes with her life, because the virus is alien and apparently originates from Laura. The child thing makes me think that Gabby, Laura’s sidekick (kinda), is going to die or go evil in “Enemy of the State II”, if she hasn’t already and we’ll have to see Laura deal with trust issues and the like. At the same time, Laura is isolated during this story and there’s nothing to fight, and that will be explored. I’m okay with the latter, since it’s good that a character so surrounded by fighting can getg a conflict where she can’t fight her way out. But the statement about Laura being isolated has me concerned that she might revert to her emo, mid-late 2000s self, who I find insufferable. But the story has potential to explore the character, which is what All-New Wolverine has done so well, albeit by using fairly average plots.

The team is okay. Tom Taylor gets Laura Kinney, and although he’s forced to retcon some things in for the sake of his All-New Wolverine stories, they mostly work. While I find him as subtle as a brick — he doesn’t seem to trust the reader to make connections between various scenes themselves, even those within the same issue — he’s good with his Laura characterisation most of the time. His plots need work, but on a character-driven solo series like this, it’s fine. While I dislike some of Taylor’s work (the Injustice: Gods Among Us tie-in), he’s a relatively new writer and All-New Wolverine reads better as it goes, so he’s clearly learning. Plus, it’s nice that he can tell his own stories, after his Earth 2 run was so heavily editor-controlled. Leonard Kirk is an okay artist, who uses slightly exaggerated faces to convey emotion, but is flexible. From the sci-fi drama of Fantastic Four to the more dark stories of Squadron Supreme, he’s shown that he’s versatile. I don’t particularly like or hate his artwork, but he’s a solid choice. Laura’s new costume is obviously supposed to invoke her time with X-Force, and… I don’t know. The brighter Wolverine costume worked for her, as someone who’s more typically superhero than Logan. And it further worries me that Laura is going to slip into the dark anti-hero thing again and start killing, which, as a character who wanted to not be a killer, is moving her character backwards (though I guess you could justify it with her not wanting her time as an experiment affecting her at all, but it’d still read badly to me personally).

There’s not much to say here. I’m glad All-New Wolverine is continuing and sounds like it will keep exploring Laura Kinney’s character in interesting ways, though I’m worried she might regress. I’m not sure how many people will jump on, but I hope it continues because this series actually gives Laura roles that suit her.

Oh, and random aside: Marvel, please tag Cable and All-New Wolverine as part of ResurrXion  on your site. And maybe have a consistent image size for the covers so I don’t have to resize them.

ResurrXion, Part 4 — Hopelessness and Greg Land (Rantings)

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Holy crap, that’s an ugly haircut… and costume. Also, what the hell emotion is Yardin trying to convey with that face?

Jean Grey
Written by Dennis Hopeless (aptly named)
Art by Victor Ibanez

When ResurrXion was being teased, lots of people thought the original Jean Grey, killed during Grant Morrison’s New X-Men, was returning. Well, that’s not the case. But even disregarding that, this comic is just… hopeless (I know, I’m so clever).

The plot will feature Jean confronting the Phoenix Force, without the experience her older self had. The world needs her to be the Jean they need her to be. It’s an okay twist on things, but it still just sounds so boring. She’s obviously going to be the Jean they need or is going to disappear at first and eventually take up the burden. That or she can just go home and Rachel Summers, who writers remember exists since she’s in X-Men: Gold, can just get the Phoenix. Or maybe the original Jean does finally come back. It doesn’t help that Jean’s just not very interesting. This Jean’s characterisation varies depending on where you read her, and not because she develops naturally; but because she’s just poorly written. Hopeless states that Jean wanting to get prepared for the Phoenix Force’s arrival is relatable to young adults thinking of the type of adult they want to be, and how this is largely based on people’s expectations and your own experiences. Which… is how that works, last time I checked. It’s pseudo-philosophical bullshit that just comes off as dumb. Jean can prepare for the Phoenix: learn self-control, mediate, psychologically prepare herself like Hope Summers in AvX, learn to use her powers more, make plans if it goes wrong, etc. Really, there are ways to prepare, and suggesting otherwise is pretty stupid. Like this series, actually.

If it wasn’t clear from the last two paragraphs, let me make it clear: I don’t like Dennis Hopeless. At all. The guy’s dialogue is godawful and he seems to think it’s clever, but comes off as a dumber and shallower Kieron Gillen or Matt Fraction. He doesn’t care about characters’ histories and personalities and bends them to suit his mediocre plots, such as in the awful Avengers Arena, Avengers Undercover and All-New X-Men (volume 2) series. And when he’s not killing off new characters with potential or writing generic fluff, he’s writing mediocre popcorn stuff like Cable and X-Force. And when he’s not doing that, he’s writing cliche-filled boring stuff like Spider-Woman. Hopeless likes to romanticise things like teenage waywardness and motherhood and frame them within the superhero genre, but he’s just too transparent about it and does little else in his stories. The guy is just a bad writer who somehow gets consistent work, and I can’t even say he’s got some magnum opus that justifies keeping him around, or even some good but flawed stuff like Cullen Bunn does with Magneto. At least not anything that’s relevant enough that people talk about it (maybe there’s some amazing, obscure series of his out there that nobody ever bought, like Alex + Ada (except even that series is popular and acclaimed enough to be cited as a work in solicitations). Hopeless seems to be kept around because Marvel need someone to write the books they seem to only publish because they have the IP.

That was a huge rant, so I’m going to give Victor Ibanez his own section. Looking at his prior Marvel works, he seems to be a fill-in artist, and an inconsistent one at that. He did a few issues of Storm and Extraordinary X-Men, and judging from them, he seems to really hate backgrounds because they’re nonexistent in a lot of his panels. His characters look good, however, and he’s got some range. He can do a less stylised look while not being minimalistic or intentionally ugly. Or he can do a more typically superhero look with lots of detail when called for. However, the man’s faces are just off sometimes, and his stuff seems to go off-model somewhat frequently, with things like absurdly long necks and just weird body proportions in general. He’s got potential, but right now, he’s a mixed bag.

Jean Grey already had an uphill battle by using the time-displaced version of the character that the majority of fans have grown tired of. But then Marvel saddled it with their worst writer, and I have absolutely no interest in this series. Jean Grey looks like it will be another crap series by Dennis Hopeless. No thanks.

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I already think I’ve seen that Logan somewhere before.

Weapon X
Written by Greg Pak
Art by Greg Land (I just threw up in my mouth a little)

It’s not really an original thought to suggest that the only current X-Men series that are actually good are All-New Wolverine and Old Man Logan. So when Weapon X was announced, it was assumed that one of the writers of those series, Tom Taylor and Jeff Lemire, respectively, would be writing Weapon X and that it would be a kind of team book featuring the Wolverine family of characters (Logan, Sabretooth, X-23, Daken, etc). However, at best we were about a quarter right.

But ignoring all of that, I like most of the cast. I don’t think Old Man Logan has interacted with the now sort-of heroic Sabretooth yet, and it will be interesting to see how that works out. Jeff Lemire wrote a good Lady Deathstrike over in Old Man Logan, and Pak wants to build on that, which I’m glad to hear, and she does have a weird relationship with the Weapon X project (her father developed the method by which Adamantium was bonded to Wolverine’s skeleton). I know next to nothing about Domino, but she’s got a kind of cool look. Thunderbird is boring to me (you can tell I don’t care about him because I forgot he also went by “Warpath”, even though I’m pretty sure I’ve only ever read him as Warpath), but he was an okay supporting character in Ed Brubaker’s X-Men run. Also of note: why isn’t X-23 here? Pak has said that there will be some familiar faces as guest stars, and I hope Laura shows up, because it’s weird that she’s not on this team, given their goals.

The actual story involves a new Weapon X project, one with even more power and resources than the original. That’s an okay plot, though I swear it’s been done before and I really hate sinister shadowy organisations with unseen goals. It barely ever works out. But yeah, Logan and Sabretooth have to form a team to stop the bad guys, using methods that group members won’t agree on. Pak also said that Weapon X will test the heroism of the heroes and the villainy of the villains, and deconstruct the morality of the characters. With a huge threat like a bigger, better Weapon X, I think that it might actually work, especially since everyone on the team is already an anti-hero, at best. The series seems to be an X-Force series in all but name, focusing mostly on Weapon X-related characters.

Greg Pak is a good writer who excels at emotionally grounding characters, such as in Storm and Action Comics. While his work can lack strong narratives, his character work is always very well done. But then there’s the art. It’s Greg Land. The internet has archives of his bad artwork. The guy’s artwork is badly posed, because he’s copying other work, and does not flow well at all. And that’s when characters aren’t blatantly traced from born, such as in Uncanny X-Men, where Emma Frost dodging a missile was blatantly a tracing of a woman masturbating. His actions scenes suffer because of the aforementioned copying, his characters can look different from panel to panel because of the aforementioned copying, and his dramatic stuff fail because there’s always a part of you that knows, or at least thinks, that you’ve seen the picture somewhere before because of the aforementioned copying. Apparently Land will also be doing a decent amount of splash pages in Weapon X, and I can already see the awkward photoshopping, posing and placement. When he actually draws original art for a story, things look okay, or even good like in Nightwing. But I think Land long ago stopped caring about the quality of his work. Hopefully a new artist comes on after an arc or two, but I doubt it since Land is the “bad, but gets stuff out on time” kind of artist.

Weapon X sounds like it will be an interesting read with bad art. There’s room for good character development and interactions, and hopefully the villain is just a plot device to allow for it. The art is not going to be good, there’s really no avoiding that, but hopefully it’s at least inoffensive in how bad it is. I’m looking forward to it.

ResurrXion, Part 3 — Something Original and Interesting and Something That Is Neither (Rantings)

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Magneto should never have that much stubble or be that pretty, Sinister looks like a pretty boy Disney villain and Juggernaut looks unfinished… Mystique and Apocalypse look cool though

Iceman

Written by Sina Grace
Art by Alessandro Vitti

For those who don’t know, Iceman sort of came out as gay within the pages of All-New X-Men (volume 1). There was controversy regarding the way writer Brian Michael Bendis went about this, but it’s something that seems to be sticking with the character. Once the teen, time-displaced Iceman tells his adult counterpart that he’s gay, the adult Iceman acts relieved in what’s actually a touching scene. Sina Grace promises to delve into Iceman’s past relationships with women, which I think will be interesting (and hopefully it’s not another excuse to make Polaris crazy). Little else is known about the series, so I’m going to believe it’s a more character-driven one, especially given the statement about exploring Iceman’s past relationships.

I’m not familiar with the creative team, but I do like that a gay man is writing it. Having personal experiences comparable to that of the characters allow you to relate your experiences and always helps with authenticity, but I just hope Sina Grace doesn’t get typecast as “the gay writer” like Christopher Priest did with Black characters. I’m not familiar with Grace’s work as a writer, but I did enjoy his art on Li’l Depressed Boy (though writer Steven S. Struble’s colouring probably played a big part in that). I’m not very familiar with Alessandro Vitti’s work at all, but he did draw Charles Soule’s run on Red Lanterns, and his work there was appropriately messy, but in a controlled way. I’m not sure if that’s just his style or if he went for that look intentionally.

Iceman has a creator I like and has the potential to be a better exploration of homosexuality than many other comics, but I just do not care about Iceman, and the way he was “revealed” to be gay irks me. I’d actually be much more interested in this comic if it were a newer character, or an older one whose homosexuality had a less… controversial history. Someone like Rictor would suit a project like this (in fact, Peter David actually did tackle Rictor’s relationship with a woman after she found out he was gay), basically any gay character who dated a decent amount of people of the opposite sex before coming out as gay. But if you’re looking for a good exploration of a gay character, and don’t mind the way that Iceman was “outed”, and/or are interested in Iceman, this sounds like it will be a decent read.

6
What is even this cast?!

Generation X

Written by Christina Strain
Art by Amilcar Pinna

I repeat: what is even this cast? No, really, we have Jubilee, Bling (who I think is gay and might have a crush on Jubilee), um… the guy who checked out Magik’s ass but then was revealed to be gay (in case you didn’t know, Bendis makes things up as he goes)… he makes himself look like other people or something. Quentin Quire (why does he keep getting use?!), um… Disney Princess Girl, and I think Northstar. Oh, and Eye-Boy. I did not make up that last one.

It’s apparently going to explore the cast as a bunch of misfit outsiders within the new X-School, which is now in New York, to further connect the X-Men with the wider Marvel universe. I honestly don’t care. New X-Men: Academy X was the best version of “Hogwarts for mutants”, and it didn’t use the tired trope of the losers vs. jocks. And you just know some characters are going to be written out of character to justify this misfit band getting together.

The characters are all D-listers except Jubilee, who’s a C-lister Marvel doesn’t know what to do with. She’s a vampire now (don’t ask, it was dumb) and also a single mum because she literally stole a baby and just kept it. She also really liked dumping the baby on other characters, and was honestly just an awful parent. And yet, the future version of the kid comes back at one point and says she was a great mother! As an Education student, Jubilee’s treatment of Shogo just annoys me. Quentin Quire is an edgelord mutant teen who likes to act edgy and kicked off the horrible Schism event. He’s awful and never develops but is shilled by Jason Aaron, and I don’t get why he still gets use. The rest are boring and/or pointless which was probably intentional to fit in with this misfit idea, but that still means they’re boring and/or pointless.

I’ve read nothing by Christina Strain, but she apparently is a cover artist and did some of the Runaways covers. I’m not sure if she’s done any interior art, but I sincerely hope so, since that would at least be some storytelling experience with comics. Amilcar Pinna is also relatively obscure, but drew the first arc of the short-lived All-New Ultimates. The art was… okay. It was pretty but didn’t work for actual storytelling, everything looking a bit too stilted and too posed. Male faces resembled Steve Dillon’s to a degree, and that is not a positive in my books. There was also the problem of conveying motion… in that it was nonexistent. So the creative team seems to be inexperienced, to say the least.

I don’t get why Generation X exists. It’s got a boring cast, a boring premise and seems to exist so there’s a young mutant book on the stands. Why is it even called Generation X? The original was a bad pun, so aside from some slight brand recognition, why use that name? Aside from it maybe fitting with the whole “misfit” idea, I mean? Whatever, this series looks pointless.

(note: this was NOT published on the 6th of December like it seems to think it was. It was published on the 12th of December.)