Wonder Woman (2016) #3 Review

Writer: Greg Rucka
Artist: Liam Sharp, Laura Martin

I’ll say straight out the gate that I’m not a big fan of Wonder Woman. I’ve never understood the appeal of the character, and everyone seems to prefer a different version of her. Some like her as the warrior woman, others like her as an ambassador, and others want a specific balance of both. Some think the New 52 run was trash, while others think it’s a refreshing take on the character, while others think it’s got good aspects. Wonder Woman’s fanbase seems divided more than any other barring the Legion of Super-Heroes’, until something truly hated comes along like Amazons Attack! or the more recent run by Meredith Finch. But Rebirth was supposed to be a golden age for Diana of Themyscira, with beloved Wonder Woman scribe — and generally awesome writer — Greg Rucka helming her ongoing once again. Along with art by Liam Sharp (never heard of him) and Nicola Scott (awesome lady who loves butts)! And with Rebirth’s nature as a a pseudo-reboot, it was gonna be a good place to jump on right? Well… no. The Rebirth issue was one event happening stretched out to a whole issue. Not only that, but it also felt kind of offensive as Diana physically destroyed aspects of her character that Azarello introduced. The first actual issue was boring as nothing really happened on Diana’s end and Steve Trevor’s plot was more interesting. Second issue was much better, but that’s the “Year One” story (the series is telling two stories in an alternating fashion). So now with issue 3, we’re back to the main storyline and… I enjoyed it! I really did enjoy it! In fact, I think I can really appreciate Wonder Woman as a character now! That’s how good this issue was! Continue reading “Wonder Woman (2016) #3 Review”

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The Flash (2016) #1 Review

Writer: Joshua Williamson
Artist: Carmine Di Giandomenico
Colourist: Ivan Plascenia

Joshua Williamson is a writer who really deserves more work. While I dropped off it, Birthright is very engaging and epic, while still being emotionally grounded and relatable. The short-lived Illuminati series managed to make all of its characters relatable, even if they were all bad guys. And now Williamson has the thankless task of writing a Barry Allen Flash ongoing after the return of Wally West, as well as needing to follow-up on Geoff Johns’ DC Universe: Rebirth #1, since Barry is a key player in the story. And this is Barry Allen we’re talking about, a character who still has no consistent personality traits. So with all this stacked against him, how does Williamson do? Pretty well! Continue reading “The Flash (2016) #1 Review”

Black Panther (2016) #2 Review

Here’s where things get messy. Christopher Priest’s Black Panther run’s big problem — aside from not having a movie to bring in big readership — was that it was very, very self-referential. It would’ve been a heavy read already, but with how focused it was on its own continuity and how necessary it was to read everything, as well as other works you probably never heard of, the longer it went, the more problematic this became. It seems Coates is going to have the same problem. Continue reading “Black Panther (2016) #2 Review”

Black Panther (2016) #1 Review

Over on my old blogspot… blog, I did some quick comic overviews. For a while now, I’ve wanted to start reviewing comics again, but the timing never quite worked out. I didn’t want to start with a random issue; I wanted to start by reviewing a first issue, at the very least. I wanted to do Black Widow, but I missed the timing on that due to uni stuff, but that may have been for the best, since now I can do Black Panther. Anyway, here goes…

Even before its release, Black Panther was going to be a big deal. It’s releasing before the character gets a bigger profile from Captain America: Civil War. It boasts an award-winning novelist as writer. I’ve never heard of the creators, but Coates apparently won an award at some point, so hey, can’t be a Scott Lobdell kind of guy.

The very first page dispelled a big concern of mine: that Coates was gonna be a novelist coming onto a lowly comic book and would want to “define” T’Challa entirely, and ignore everything that came before. But instead, Coates chooses to acknowledge what came before in a natural and fitting manner. It’s refreshing to have a new writer, a novelist at that, who doesn’t wipe away everything that came before. Continue reading “Black Panther (2016) #1 Review”